RSS

Category Archives: Giving Witness Day by Day

IS THERE A CURE FOR ME AT KNOCK, IRELAND?

IS THERE A CURE FOR ME AT KNOCK, IRELAND?

MEDICAL AND OTHER CURES AT KNOCK 

Cures began taking place at Knock soon after the apparition, and Archdeacon Cavanagh kept a record of them. Here is his first account of the first recorded cure:

DELIA GORDON OF CLAREMORRIS

“On the 31st August 1879 (ten days after the apparition), a girl aged twelve years was cured while attending Mass at Knock. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Gordon of Claremorris, attested that Delia had suffered intensely all her life from deafness and violent pains in her left ear. Several times a week they had to get up in the night to try to relieve the awful pain by various remedies. They took her on a pilgrimage to Knock. While attending Mass there, the pain attacked Delia so badly that she began to cry, and Mrs. Gordon had to bring her outside where they knelt in prayer before the place where the apparition was seen. Mrs. Gordon picked out a piece of cement from the gable, made the Sign of the Cross over it and placed it in the afflicted ear. Almost immediately the pain completely disappeared never to return and no trace of deafness remained. Her general health improved rapidly and in a very short time she became the picture of health and strength.”

THOUSANDS OF CURES

There were thousands of such cures, but they were not scientifically investigated until 1936. In that year the Medical Bureau was established. This Bureau is modelled after the one at Lourdes. Now the world is offered scientific proof of the cures that take place at Knock. Doctors who have no religion at all have admitted that the Bureau is run in an impartial manner and that every case is investigated carefully.

– From: “The Woman Shall Conquer” by Don Sharkey, Prow Books/Franciscan Marytown Press, Libertyville, IL, 1954

 

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

THE COMFORTS OF LIFE ARE THE MAIN CAUSE OF OUR WANT OF LOVE OF GOD

THE COMFORTS OF LIFE ARE THE MAIN CAUSE OF OUR WANT OF LOVE OF GOD

I must say plainly this, that fanciful though it may appear at first sight, the comforts of life are the main cause of our want of love of God; and, much as we may lament and struggle against it, till we learn to dispense with them in good measure, we shall not overcome it.

Till we, in a certain sense, detach ourselves from our bodies, our minds will not be in a state to receive divine impressions, and to exert heavenly aspirations.

A smooth and easy life, an uninterrupted enjoyment of the goods of Providence, full meals, soft raiment, well-furnished homes, the pleasures of sense, the feeling of security, the consciousness of wealth – these and the like, if we are not careful, choke up all the avenues of the soul.

– Bl. John Henry Newman; The necessity of self-denial; P. S. V, 337

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

HOW CAN I BE GOOD?

HOW CAN I BE GOOD?

Dear little souls, God loves, you and your sufferings are not unknown to me; you who so ardently feel the happiness of devoting yourselves to others, but are unable to do so, because the occasions seem to fly from you; you who so often try to devote yourselves, but are suddenly held back by timidity and the fear of not being accepted – it is for you that I have collected these little occupations, which permit you to taste, without coming from under the shadow of silence and obscurity, the joys of a devotion known to God alone, of a benevolence all the sweeter to the heart of him who exercises it because no one thinks of thanking him.

THE SWEET OFFICE OF MEDIATOR

This little occupation consists in never suffering two hearts in a family or community to remain for any length of time at variance.

It seems a most natural thing to extend your hand to a friend who is offended, saying simply, with that friendly smile which brightens the whole countenamce: Let us love each other as we did before.

The wounded heart closes, retires, and shrinks back upon itself, exaggerating the injuries inflicted on it by a friend and its own wrongs, and it remains estranged; it desires to revive the old friendship, but it knows not how to commence.

Oh! if some advance were only made.

Make it, you who accept the sweet office of mediator. Go from one to the other; be the bearer of a simple good morning; tell him who is offended that you have seen his friend sad.

Is there a reparation to be made, a pardon to be asked? Take it upon yourself, arrange an interview, cause a smile, a tear. Do not become weary until you have re-established the union between these two hearts.

And then quietly resume your ordinary life, as if you had done nothing, and await some new occasion of being useful.

Oh! what account will not God take of your steps and your words.

– From: Golden Grains, A Collection of Counsels for the Sanctification And Happiness of Every-Day Life, M. H. Gill & Son, Dublin, 1889

MORE WAYS TO BE GOOD

The Repairer of Neglects

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

THE FAMOUS ROSES OF STOCKPORT

THE FAMOUS ROSES OF STOCKPORT

From the England of today there also comes the story of the famous roses of Stockport. 

MAY CROWNING 

On the first Sunday of May, 1947, five-year-old Pauline Byrne placed a crown of roses on the statue of our Lady in St Mary’s Church, Stockport, England. The incident was similar to hundreds of May crownings taking place throughout the world.

YELLOW TEA ROSES

Rev. James Turner, D. D., pastor of St Mary’s, says that 1947 was the golden jubilee of his church. When ordering the crown for the statue, he asked the florist to choose yellow tea roses, as being the colour nearest to gold.

LOVELY, BUT TERRIBLY FRAIL

“When I received the crown on Saturday evening,” Father Turner says, “it looked lovely but terribly frail. I did not think it would remain presentable till the next day.

“Towards the middle of May I was surprised to see the roses in the crown still intact and beautiful; in all previous years the roses had fallen out after a week or ten days.

“At the end of the month I always took the statue back to my bedroom, although the people always begged me to leave the statue in the sanctuary because they loved it so much. But I was always adamant and said that June is the month of the Sacred Heart and our Blessed Mother must give in to her divine Son.

“At the end of May the roses were still intact and beautiful. I said to my parishioners: ‘Well, you have always asked me to leave the statue in the sanctuary. I will do so as long as the roses remain intact.’ Half jokingly, I added, ‘If our Lady wants to stay in her place of honour, well, it’s up to her to keep the roses as they are.’

I DO BELIEVE THAT OUR BLESSED MOTHER TOOK UP THE CHALLENGE 

“Really, I do believe that our Blessed Mother took up the challenge, because month succeeded month, and there was still no change in the roses.”

In October, a reporter heard about the roses, and the story went all over the world. Visitors came by the hundreds.

The following year, the same May queen deposited a second crown of 17 golden ophelias on top of the first. This crown also failed to fade. In May, 1949, seven-year-old Anne Carley placed a third crown on the statue.

“To this day,” says Father Turner, “there has not fallen a single petal from any one of the 50 roses.

HIS BELOVED DAUGHTER, HIS CHERISHED MOTHER, HIS CHASTE SPOUSE

“Personally I look upon the three crowns as being beautifully symbolic of our Blessed Mother being crowned by the Eternal Father as His Beloved Daughter, by the Eternal Son as His cherished Mother, and by the Holy Ghost as His chaste spouse. Again I look upon the 50 roses as symbolising the 50 Hail Marys of the Rosary.

THE FIFTY HAIL MARYS OF THE ROSARY 

“For these reasons I did not wish to superimpose a fourth crown on our Lady of the Roses, and so I decided to place a crown on Our Lady of Lourdes. To our amazement, this crown is following the example of the crowns on Our Lady of Roses.

A MIRACLE? 

A woman reporter examined this fourth crown in June, 1950, when it was more than six weeks old. She rubbed the petals and the delicate ferns between her fingers. They were completely dry, completely dehydrated; but they retained their original shape and form and virtually their original colour. They looked like living roses and living ferns, but they were not. From their dryness, one would have expected them to fall to the floor, but they did not.

The reporter could not feel the first three crowns, because they were too high. From their appearance, however, she judged them to be in the same condition.

The Church has not pronounced upon the roses of Stockport, so we do not know whether they can be considered miraculous. If the Church does declare that a miracle has taken place, England, and the entire world, will have cause for great rejoicing.

– From: “The Woman Shall Conquer” by Don Sharkey, Prow Books/Franciscan Marytown Press, Libertyville, IL, 1954

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

“ARISE MY LOVE, MY BEAUTIFUL ONE, AND COME”

“ARISE MY LOVE, MY BEAUTIFUL ONE, AND COME”

ST DOMINIC SAVIO’S PREDICTION CONCERNING ENGLAND

A prediction which Dominic Savio made about England: The message was relayed to Pope Pius IX by St John Bosco.

Dominic Savio was born in 1842 and died in 1857, a month before his fifteenth birthday. He was declared a Venerable in 1933 and was beatified in 1951.

Dominic told Don Bosco several times that he wished he could see the Pope. Don Bosco asked him why.

“If I could only talk to the Holy Father,” Dominic replied, “I would tell him that in spite of the great trials which he has to suffer at present, he should not lose heart in his solicitude for England. God is preparing a great triumph for Catholicism in that country.”

“What makes you say such a thing?” questioned Don Bosco.

“I’ll tell you,” replied the boy, “but don’t mention it to the others or they might think it foolish. But if you go to Rome tell Pius IX for me. This is why I think so. One morning, during my thanksgiving after Communion, I had a distraction, which was strange for me. I thought I saw a great stretch of country covered in a thick for, and it was filled with many people. They were moving about, but like men not sure where to put their feet. Somebody nearby said, ‘This is England.’ I was just about to question the man when I saw His Holiness, Pius IX, as I had seen him in pictures. He was richly dressed and carried a bright torch with which he approached the multitude, as if to enlighten their darkness. As he drew near, the torch seemed to disperse the fog, and the people were left in broad daylight. ‘This torch,’ said the man near me, ‘is the Catholic religion, which is to illumine England.’ ”

Don Bosco told the Pope about the incident in 1858. The Holy Father said: “What you have told me confirms me in my resolution to do all that is possible for England, which has long been the object of my special care. What you have related is, to put it at its lowest estimation, the counsel of a devout soul.”

“THE COUNSEL OF A DEVOUT SOUL”

It was Pope Pius IX who had re-established the hierarchy in England in 1850, after a lapse of 300 years.

In 1852, Dr John Henry Newman, later Cardinal, delivered his famous sermon in which he referred to the restoration of the Church in England as “The Second Spring”. In the course of the sermon he said: “Arise my love, my beautiful one, and come. It is time for thy Visitation. Arise, Mary, and go forth in thy strength to that north country, which once was thy own, and take possession of a land which knows thee not. Arise, Mother of God, and with thy thrilling voice speak to those who labour with child, and are in pain, till the babe of grace leaps within them. Shine on us, dear Lady, with thy bright countenance, like the sun in his strength, O stella maturing, O harbinger of peace, till our year is one perpetual May. From thy sweet eyes, from thy pure smile, from thy majestic brow, let ten thousand influences rain down, not to confound or overwhelm, but to persuade, to win over thine enemies. O Mary, my hope, Mother undefiled, fulfil to us the promise of this Spring.”

THE POSITION OF THE CHURCH WAS JUST BEGINNING TO IMPROVE AFTER CENTURIES OF SUPPRESSION

When Newman preached his sermon, The Second Spring, in 1852, the position of the Church was just beginning to improve after centuries of suppression. The Church in England has had a remarkable growth since then. Some authorities say that one Englishman out of every ten today is a Catholic, although it is impossible to secure exact figures. If we count only practicing members, the Catholic Church is the largest religious body in England today, larger even than the Church of England. In the past century Catholics have wielded an influence out of proportion to their numbers. Newman has enriched our spiritual life and our literature. Chesterton has trumpeted merry defiance to modern paganism. Bellow, Knox, and many others have given us cause to be grateful. Three of the most prominent of all living novelists – Graham Greene, Evelyn Waugh and Bruce Marshal – are British Catholics. Yes, England is having its Second Spring. Throughout the country devotion to the Blessed Mother has spread greatly. This is true not only among Catholics, but among Anglicans and other Protestants as well. For centuries our Lady was virtually exiled from England, but that is true no longer.

“When England goes back to Walsingham, our Lady will come back to England.” England, it would appear, is well on its way back to Walsingham. We may hope that under our Lady’s guidance and protection England’s Second Spring will soon give way to full summer.

– From: “The Woman Shall Conquer” by Don Sharkey, Prow Books/Franciscan Marytown Press, Libertyville, IL, 1954

 

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

OUR DAILY APOSTOLIC WORK AND PRAYER-LIFE

OUR DAILY APOSTOLIC WORK AND PRAYER-LIFE

MARY’S ARMY

Previous chapter: TAKING ON BOARD THE OPINIONS OF OTHERS PARALYSES THE POWERS OF ACTION

HOLINESS THROUGH MARY

Courage is shown not only in the performance of the Child of Mary’s apostolic work but also in his prayer-life. His devotion to the means of grace appointed by the Church and fidelity to prayer have a quality of heroism and are models and inspirations to the rest of the faithful. Only thus will he attain the degree of courage expected of him in his work for souls.

Courage

Natural timidity and fear, false or well-grounded, must be overcome. Every member amongst the most wretched and dejected of the population must not only be visited but known personally and intimately. This is the goal, and his courage must rise to attain it. He always remembers that his search for each individual member of the degraded classes may be their only chance of eternal life. How intense, how earnest, how courageous must that search be!

Natural philanthropy is not love and requires no courage

Natural philanthropy serves humanity for humanity’s sake; but that is not love and it requires no courage. The apostolate sets itself to devoted and universal attention to the “down-and-out,” the hopeless, the impossible, the unlovely, the repulsive elements of the population that those who see it at work are amazed at the courage of such love and recognise in it a confounding of the materialistic systems which offer but a counterfeit of Christian charity. The effect is electrifying; even the irreligious are startled into a new seriousness towards religion; modes of thought are changed, and new and nobler ways of living begin to show themselves.

Beyond the prudence of the flesh

Through the strictly disciplined system of the apostolate, the member is thoroughly trained in the spirit and practice of prudence. He is warned against a common fallacy of the present day which confounds the Christian virtue of prudence with what is merely natural – the prudence of the flesh.

The Gospel must be preached to every creature

In the first place, exercise of prudence demands a mature deliberation of which the best means to attain the end in view may be discovered, and a wise judgment as to the means likely to be most effectual. Secondly, it requires that the plan adopted be executed without delay, but with foresight, discretion and necessary caution. The Gospel must be preached to every creature. That supreme wish must swallow up every difficulty and overcome every obstacle.

Apostolic outlook

The Child of Mary is trained in such a way that his outlook will invariably be apostolic. The apostolic spirit enters his soul and reigns there as master. By a judicious mixture of prudence and courage, he sets himself against the spirit of cowardliness which seems to prevail even amongst the good. His training fits him to undertake difficult work and the system reduces the possibilities of harm to the absolute minimum. When it is known that a work is difficult and dangerous, but yet it is necessary if certain souls are to be saved, everything possible is done in the interest of safety and the attack goes on with appropriate materials. He does not stand by and look on while souls are being plunged into hell.

– Excerpts from “Holiness Through Mary” by Fr Francis Ripley, copied from a pamphlet by the Universal Rosary Association. For the Association’s details, please visit the link above (Part 1).

 

Tags: , , ,

SUPREME JOY

SUPREME JOY

ABNEGATION (poem)

 

To love the loving when skies above

Love’s heaven are fair; to see the bloom

Of flowers we plant from our hearts of love

In hearts that pity our days of gloom;

 

To know in a world where all forget

A love unchanging – are joys supreme

For the loving soul; but they fill not yet

The measure fair of a Christian’s dream.

 

For generous souls seek other bliss

Than love rewarding love; their hope

Has loftier flight and broader scope,

And finds fruitition not in this

 

In self-forgetfulness they live,

In sacrifice their dream is wrought,

Believing that, receiving naught,

Their highest pleasure is to give.

 

– Golden Grains, Sanctification and Happiness of Every-Day Life, Eighth Edition, M.H. Gill and Son, Dublin, 1889

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,