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PRAYER FOR CATECHISTS

PRAYER FOR CATECHISTS

LET THEM COME TO ME, FOR OF SUCH IS THE KINGDOM OF HEAVEN.

O Jesus, Friend of children, Who from thy most tender years didst grow visibly in wisdom and in grace before God and men; Who at the age of twelve east seated in the Temple, in the midst of the doctors, listening to them attentively, asking them questions, and exciting their admiration by the prudence and wisdom of thy discourse; Who didst receive so willingly the children, blessing them and saying to thy disciples: “Let them come to Me, for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven,” inspire me as thou didst inspire Blessed Peter Canisius, model and guide of the perfect Catechist, with a profound respect and a holy affection for childhood, a taste and a marked devotion for instructing them in Christian doctrine, a special aptitude in making them understand its mysteries, and love its beauties. I ask this of thee, through the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

[300 days, once a day. – Pius X., March 15th, 1906.]

– St Anthony’s Treasury, Laverty & Sons, Leeds, 1916

 

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AFTER FIRST COMMUNION SHE GAINED MORE SELF-CONTROL AS SHE DEEPENED HER UNDERSTANDING OF GOD: ST ELIZABETH OF THE TRINITY

AFTER FIRST COMMUNION SHE GAINED MORE SELF-CONTROL AS SHE DEEPENED HER UNDERSTANDING OF GOD: ST ELIZABETH OF THE TRINITY

She had a terrible temper as a child

On 16th October, Pope Francis celebrated a Mass of Canonisation, giving the church some new saints. One of these is St Elizabeth of the Trinity. She was born in 1880 in the military base at Avord in France. Her father was a Captain. St Elizabeth was baptised in the chapel of the military base. Sadly, her father died when St Elizabeth was seven years old and the family moved to Dijon. St Elizabeth had a terrible temper as a child, but after receiving her First Holy Communion she was able to gain more self-control as she deepened her understanding of God.

She gained an understanding of the Most Holy Trinity

She also gained a profound understanding of the Most Holy Trinity, which she cultivated in ardent devotion. St Elizabeth started to visit the sick, sing in the church choir and taught religion to the young people who worked at the local factories. As she grew older, St Elizabeth became interested in entering the Discalced Carmelite Order, though her mother was very much against this. St Elizabeth declined marriage from several men because of the desire that she had for religious life.

A fulfilled life of selfless, loving service

St Elizabeth entered the Dijon Carmel in 1901. She said, “I find Him everywhere while doing the washing as well as while praying.” Realising that she had become very ill, she also said: “I think in heaven my mission will be to draw souls by helping them to go out of themselves in order to cling to God by a wholly simple and loving movement, and to keep in the great silence within which will allow God to communicate Himself to them and transform them into Himself.” Her spirituality is considered to be remarkably similar to that of her contemporary St Therese of Lisieux, who was also in Carmel. The two saints shared a zeal for the salvation of souls. St Elizabeth died at the young age of 26, having contracted Addison’s disease. Though her death was painful, St Elizabeth gratefully accepted her suffering as a gift from God. Her last words were: “I am going to Light, to Love, to Life.”

St Elizabeth of the Trinity, pray for us.

– From: Spiritual Thought From Fr Chris, 2016

 

 

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HOW YOU AVOID SEEDS OF DISCONTENT FROM SPROUTING IN YOUR LIFE

HOW YOU AVOID SEEDS OF DISCONTENT FROM SPROUTING IN YOUR LIFE

In order that life may be good and pleasant, occupation should surround and enter into it, as the air surrounds and penetrates the body.

To be without some useful occupation, which in addition to our great duties will fill all those little moments when we are alone, is to slowly plant within ourselves the seeds of a discontent which will end by destroying our cheerfulness, weakening our virtue, and embittering our character.

It would seem that a person who has noble thoughts, who says nothing ungracious, who is assiduous in her hours of work, and faithful to the demands on her position, needs nothing more to make her life good and useful. But no; her life, with all this, is not sufficiently useful, nor consequently meritorious, if, outside these duties, when she is alone, she permits her mind and heart to drift aimlessly on, because then her life is filled with little voids.

And through these moments of dreamy idleness there will come and go “troubles about nothing, dark clouds, little suspicions, sudden silences, cutting words, prolonged weariness, and sullenness without cause.”

Mothers, friends, you who wish to be always loved, find constantly some new and interesting occupation for those to whom you devote yourselves.

And you who wish to remain always joyous, pure, and loving, impose on yourselves each day some task: something definite, in order that you may not have the trouble of seeking it; something simple, which you can leave and resume without trouble; something interesting, which will attract you when your serious occupations are ended, retain you by its charm, and fill the voids in your day; “for instance, a collection to complete, a book to examine, something to learn, a work of art to perfect…”

God has given to occupation the mission of the north wind – that of purifying the miasma of the heart, as the wind purifies the miasma of the atmosphere.

The saints have all been very busy, even overburdened.

– From: Golden Grains, Eighth Edition, M. H. Gill and Son, Dublin, 1889

 
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Posted by on May 17, 2016 in Words of Wisdom

 

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LIVING THE GOSPEL: LITTLE GOOD WORKS OF LOVE FOR CHILDREN, TEENAGERS AND ADULTS (I)

LIVING THE GOSPEL: LITTLE GOOD WORKS OF LOVE FOR CHILDREN, TEENAGERS AND ADULTS (I)

LITTLE OCCUPATIONS

The Repairer of Neglects

Even persons of most generous dispositions and quick perceptions, in the midst of the unceasing occupations of a family, will often forget a number of those minute details, insignificant in themselves, but the deprivation of which is a real trial to certain temperaments. The details of family life are like the small screws which bind together the different parts of a piece of furniture: withdraw one or two of them, and the piece of furniture loses its shape; it becomes disjointed.

It is thus, also, in a family; its harmony is oftentimes only to be ascribed to the care taken not to neglect one of those trifling nothings of politeness, punctuality, or habit, to all of which we should pay almost as much attention as we give to greater duties.

Doing one’s bit for love: happiness, harmony and emotional security in the family 

Each member of a family, especially if he is advanced in years, has his little peculiarities, which render him happy in some way or other.

Perhaps it is a garment made to a special pattern.

Or a newspaper brought at a particular hour.

Or a game played in such a place.

Or a visit expected at some precise moment.

Or the expression of congratulations at a particular hour.

Or a desire scarcely manifested, but often experienced…

Watch all these little things. Take it upon yourself to visit every morning the corners where the members of the family like to find everything that may be useful during the day. Go first to the apartment where they all assemble; remove everything that might displease them; perfect all the arrangements which have been carelessly made.

But do it all without noise, and unostentatiously. Enjoy only the happiness which it affords you. Oh! how God will repay you in heaven.

– From: Golden Grains, Eighth Edition, H.M. Gill and Son, Dublin, 1889

 

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“I GATHER DOUBLE RICHES FROM THE FLOWERS”

“I GATHER DOUBLE RICHES FROM THE FLOWERS”

THE BEE – A LITTLE 19th CENTURY STORY FOR PIOUS CHILDREN

What art thou doing, fragile, little bee, among the flowers, which, opening out their chalices, seem to invite thee?

The sun is bright in the heavens, but its burning rays arrest not thy unceasing industry.

The flower, upon which thou dost alight, withers not beneath the touch of thy wing, and its delicate stem does not bend beneath the weight of thy agile frame.

Why this incessant toil?

I gather double riches from the flowers.

The one is sweet and odorous honey to refresh the lips of childhood.

The other is pure wax which may be burned afterwards in loving homage before the altar of Mary. Child, the house which shelters thee is like the field in which I labour.

The lessons, and above all, the example of thy mother and thy teacher, are the flowers from which, like me, thou canst draw nourishment.

Work on, without rest, while it is yet the spring-time of thy life.

Later, alas! thou wilt no longer find hearts that open at thy approach to give forth their treasures, like that of thy mother or thy teacher.

And divide also into two parts the lessons which thou gatherest.

One for thy companions of to-day, and for thy family – “benevolence and amiability.”

The other for God and Mary – “innocence and prayer.”

– From: “Golden Grains, Eighth Edition, H.M. Gill and Son, Dublin, 1889 (first published in 1871)

 

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WHAT IS THE REASON FOR THE INQUIETUDE OF A SOUL OR OF A FAMILY?

The inquietude of a soul or of a family always comes from the absence of the direct action of God.

Do you wish that life should return to these drooping souls with all its fullness, bringing its clear sky and joyous sun?

Bring back God to them.

 

– From: Golden Grains, Eighth Edition, H.M. Gill and Son, Dublin, 1889

 

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“ACCEPT, O LORD, MY ENTIRE LIBERTY” – PRAYER TO OUR LORD JESUS IN THE BLESSED SACRAMENT

The devout soul before the Blessed Sacrament and after Holy Communion

Accept, O Lord, my entire Liberty

Bind my hands and lead them whither thou wilt.

Is it thy will that my life should be spent in the midst of turmoil and noise, and amid that unceasing labour which prevents those sweet moments of rest, which are the dreams of the mind and of the heart? If so, may thy will be done.

Is it thy will that, alone, sad, and abandoned, I should remain on earth when all I love have gone to thee in heaven? If so, may thy will be done.

Is it thy will that, unknown to all, and despised even by those whose affection I would most value, I should be looked on as useless on account of my want of talent and affability, or on account of my bad health? If so, may thy will be done.

Is it thy will that I should be torn from my family, placed within the walls of a cloister far, far distant, or in a strange family, thus being destroyed my former habits, affections, comfort, and even that repose of heart and mind which thou hast made so sweet to me? If so, may thy will be done!

Thou art my Master, O Lord! but lead me thyself; remain always near me.

Accept my Memory

My memory, that mysterious book, which is a reflection of the book of eternity, in which at every moment my thoughts, affections, and desires are engraved.

I place it in thy hands, O my God! in order that thou alone mayest efface or write therein.

Leave in it, O Lord! the remembrance of the gravity of my faults, but efface for ever the wicked pleasures of my sins.

If I were to have a glimpse at their guilty sweetness, perchance I would still desire them.

Leave there the sweet memories of my childhood, when I loved thee so simply, O my God! when my father, my mother, and my family were the only objects of my affection; when a trifling untruth, or even the fear of having committed a fault, tormented me till I confided it to my mother.

When I saw my good angel everywhere, aiding me in little tasks, or consoling me in my petty annoyances.

Leave me the remembrance of the first absolution I received, when, with a soul overflowing with joy, I cried out: “I am pardoned, my sins are forgiven!”

And the remembrance of my first communion – oh! restore it to me, my God, with its preparation so awesome but so loving, with its joy so calm, so holy, and sweet that the thought of it still moves me to tears.

Leave me the remembrance of my benefits!

Each year of my life shines before me as if surrounded by an areole of graces: my tenth year, my fifteenth, my eighteenth, my twentieth… How I am reminded of thy goodness, O my God!

Yes, accept my memory, and efface from it everything that could estrange me from thee. May nothing, nothing outside thee and my family be engraven again on it!

Accept, O Lord, my Mind.

– From: Golden Grains, Eighth Edition, H.M. Gill and Son, Dublin, 1889

 
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Posted by on February 27, 2016 in Words of Wisdom

 

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