RSS

Tag Archives: Emperor Charles

ST FRANCIS BORGIA, CONFESSOR

ST FRANCIS BORGIA, CONFESSOR

ST FRANCIS BORGIA, CONFESSOR – MEMORIAL: OCTOBER 10

Francis,the fourth Duke of Gandia, first shone as an example of upright life at the court of the Emperor Charles V. When he escorted the body of the Empress Isabella to Granada for burial, seeing in her countenance, so horribly changed by corruption, the fate of all mortals, he bound himself by a vow to abandon all things and to serve only the King of kings.

HE VOWED TO SERVE ONLY THE KING OF KINGS

Therefore, after the death of his wife, Eleanor of Castile, he entered the Society of Jesus. He was chosen by St Ignatius as Commissary-General for Spain, and a little later, though against his will, he was selected as the third Prepositor General of the whole Society. Pope Pius V appointed him an associate of Cardinal Allessandrino in an embassy to unite Christian princes against the Turks. Francis undertook this arduous journey and, nevertheless, happily completed his life’s course at Rome, as he would have wished, in the year of salvation 1572. He was added to the number of the saints by Clement X.

PRAYER:

O Lord Jesus Christ, model of true humility and its reward, we beseech you, that as you made blessed Francis one of your glorious imitators by his contempt for earthly honours, grant us to follow his example and to share in his glory. Who live…

– From: An Approved English Translation of the Breviarium Romanum, Burns & Oates, London, 1964

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

OCTOBER – THE MONTH OF THE HOLY ROSARY

OCTOBER – THE MONTH OF THE HOLY ROSARY

Pope Clement XI firmly held to the opinion that  [ apart from the Victory of Lepanto ] other famous victories must be attributed to the intercession of the Blessed Virgin. In 1716, Charles VI, Emperor Elect of the Romans, won a tremendous triumph in the kingdom of Hungary over an overwhelming army of Turks, on the very day on which the feast of the dedication of the basilica of Our Lady of Snows was being celebrated. Indeed almost at the very moment of battle, the confraternity of the most holy Rosary was offering up public and solemn prayer in the Eternal City.

PUBLIC AND SOLEMN PRAYER IN THE ETERNAL CITY

An immense number of people took part in this demonstration. They poured forth with great devotion fervent prayers to God for the overthrow of the Turks. They implored the powerful intercession of the Virgin Mother of God for the help of Christians. In view of this victory, and also of the raising of the siege of the island of Corcyra which followed almost immediately, Clement made this decree. That the memory of these extraordinary favours may be perpetuated forever, that the faithful might be thankful forever, Clement extended the observance of the feast of the most holy Rosary to the universal Church. He ordered that it be continued to be celebrated under the rite of a double major.

HE BESOUGHT THE FAITHFUL ALL OVER THE WORLD TO RECITE THE ROSARY FREQUENTLY 

Benedict XIII decreed that all these things be written into the Roman Breviary. When the Church was experiencing one of the most turbulent periods in her history, when for a long time a veritable fury of hard pressing evils was raging, Leo XIII, in a series of Encyclical letters earnestly besought the faithful all over the world to recite the Rosary frequently, especially in the month of October. He raised the rank of the rite of the feast and added to the Litany of Loreto the invocation, “Queen of the most holy Rosary.” He granted as well a special office to be recited on the solemn feast by the Universal Church. Let us, therefore, ever honour the most holy Mother of God by the devotion very dear to her. May she who so many times has answered the prayers of Christ’s faithful in the recitation of the Rosary, who brought their earthly enemies to destruction and defeat, grant victory over the powers of hell to us also.

– From: An Approved English Translation of the Breviarium Romanum, Burns & Oates, London, 1964

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

IS THERE A PARTICULAR CATHOLIC APPROACH TO WAR?

“Already there seem to be controversies over how to commemorate the centenary of the First World War. Is there a particular Catholic approach to this Question?

ANSWER BY FR TIM: The Catechism (2307 ff) gives some general guidance on the question of war. First, that ‘all citizens and all governments are obliged to work for the avoidance of war’. It also sets out certain conditions which must be met if defence by military force is to be legitimate. On matters of historical debate such as the First World War, Catholics are free to disagree, though we would agree in deploring the carnage that took place in that war (and indeed in World War II.)

Those of a more pacifist leaning might focus particularly on the war poets, the description of the horrors of the trenches and the high rate of casualties. They would also point to the danger of jingoism and the manipulation of public opinion.

Others might consider that the heroism of many of the officers and men is not sufficiently recognised, and that the war was fought in order to protect Britain and other countries from a determined aggressor bent on the domination of Europe. During this year we will hear many arguments on both sides and perhaps become a little better informed. Such an education is valuable in itself if we wish to learn from our own history.

I hope that the place of the Blessed Charles I of Austria, who became Austro-Hungarian Emperor in 1916, is not forgotten during the centenary. From the start of his reign he worked to bring about peace between the belligerents, offering painful concessions in an attempt to avoid further bloodshed. He also unconditionally supported the peace proposals of Pope Benedict XV. Anatole France wrote of him: ‘Emperor Karl is the only decent man to come out of the war in a leadership position, yet he was a saint and no one listened to him. He sincerely wanted peace, and therefore was despised by the whole world. It was a wonderful chance that was lost.’ As Catholics, we should raise awareness of the efforts that the Pope and Blessed Charles made for peace.”
– This article by Fr Tim Finigan was published in the feature “Catholic Dilemmas” in “The Catholic Herald” issue January 10 2014. For subscriptions please visit http://www.catholicherald.co.uk (external link).

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , ,