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ST SYLVESTER GOZZOLINI, ABBOT

ST SYLVESTER GOZZOLINI, ABBOT

ST SYLVESTER GOZZOLINI, ABBOT – MEMORIAL: NOVEMBER 26

Sylvester, born of a noble family at Osimo, in Picenum, was remarkable, even as a boy, for his keen intelligence and upright conduct. Being duly instructed in sacred learning and made a Canon, he benefited his people by his example and his sermons. At the funeral of a relative, who was also a nobleman and a very handsome person, on seeing the disfigured corpse in the open tomb, he said: “What this man was, I am now; what he is now, I shall be.”

WITH THE DESIRE FOR GREATER PERFECTION, HE SPENT HIMSELF IN VIGILS, PRAYER AND FASTING 

He soon retired to a lonely place with the desire for greater perfection, and there spent himself in vigils, prayer and fasting. To hide himself better from men, he kept changing his dwelling place. At length, he arrived at Monte Fano, at that time a solitary place, built a church in honour of St Benedict and laid the foundations of the Congregation of Sylvestrines. There he strengthened the monks with his wonderful holiness. He shone with the spirit of prophecy, and possessed power over the demons and other gifts, which he always tried to hide with deep humility. He fell asleep in the Lord in the year of salvation 1267.

PRAYER:

Most merciful God, who, when the holy Abbot Sylvester was devoutly meditating upon the vanity of this world beside an open grave, graciously willed to call him into the desert and enrich him with unusual merits, we humbly pray that, following his example, despising the things of earth, we may thoroughly enjoy your everlasting presence. Through our Lord…

– From: An Approved English Translation of the Breviarium Romanum, Burns & Oates, London, 1964

 

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ST LAURENCE O’TOOLE, BISHOP

ST LAURENCE O’TOOLE, BISHOP

ST LAURENCE O’TOOLE, BISHOP – MEMORIAL: NOVEMBER 14

St Laurence O’Toole, Patron of the Diocese and City of Dublin, was born near Castledermot, County Kildare, in 1127. His father was Maurice O’Toole, prince of the territory now called South Kildare, and his mother was daughter of O’Byrne, prince of the north-eastern portion of Co. Kildare.

The cross was his portion from childhood, for from ten years old till he was twelve, he was a hostage of Dermot MacMurrough, who treated him with relentless cruelty. Ferns, then a wild and desert place, was probably the scene of the hardships and privations of our Saint. Here, no doubt, the foundation was laid of that wonderful mortification, and spirit of contemplation and prayer, which distinguished his later life.

At the demand of Maurice O’Toole, our Saint was transferred to the custody of the Bishop of Glendalough, under whose care his health, impaired by privation and neglect, returned, and he engaged in a course of study with the greatest ardour. Some time after he became a monk of St Kevin’s Monastery, Glendalough, was ordained priest, and later, in 1153, was chosen Abbot by the monks.

On the death of Gregory, Archbishop of Dublin, 1161, St Laurence was elected to succeed him, and was consecrated by Gelasius, Archbishop of Armagh, in the Church of the Holy Trinity (now Christ Church), Dublin, 1162. In 1179 he attended the Third General Council of the Lateran, and Pope Alexander III made him Delegate Apostolic of the Holy See for the Kingdom of Ireland.

Full of virtues and labouring for the peace of his beloved but afflicted country, he died at the age of 53, on the 14th November, 1180,at the Abbey our Lord, at Eu, Normandy. At the moment of his holy death the Abbey was so flooded with celestial light that it was thought to be on fire. St Laurence was canonised by Pope Honorius III, in 1225, who mentions in the Bull of Canonisation that seven dead persons were restored by his intercession.

– St Anthony’s Treasury, 1916

 

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FAITHFUL THROUGH CENTURIES OF PERSECUTIONS

FAITHFUL THROUGH CENTURIES OF PERSECUTIONS

OUR LADY OF KNOCK (1879) CAME TO A COUNTRY WHICH HAD REMAINED FAITHFUL THROUGH CENTURIES OF PERSECUTIONS

Mary came to a country which had remained faithful through centuries of trials and persecutions. Ireland was poverty stricken, with most of its people living in almost unbelievable squalor. The Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829 had officially ended three centuries of persecution of the Church. During that time thousands of persons had been put to death for their religion.

THE PERSECUTION HAD TAKEN A MORE INSIDIOUS FORM

After 1829, the persecution simply took a more insidious form. Catholics were no longer slaughtered, but they were offered bribes of food and money to abandon their religion and to send their children to non-Catholic schools. It must have been difficult for a man to refuse such a bribe in the famine years when he saw the thin emaciated faces of his wife and children, but the vast majority of people preferred starvation to renouncing their faith.

THE MAJORITY OF PEOPLE PREFERRED STARVATION TO RENOUNCING THE FAITH 

The year 1847 was one of the worst in Ireland’s history. That was the year of the dread potato famine, when thousands died of starvation and thousands of others were forced to leave the country. When it was over, the population of Ireland was half of what it had been, and even today it is much smaller than it was before 1847. There were failures of the potato crop again in 1877, 1878, and 1879.

Typhus fever struck down many of those who escaped death by starvation. At the Cross graveyard in the north of Mayo there were from five to fifteen funerals a day. Because the people were so poor and because so many died, most of them had to be buried without coffins.

Famine, fever, abject poverty, cruel persecution – surely a nation could bear no more. It seemed that the Irish race was destined to be wiped out. Just when conditions were at their worst, Mary appeared at Knock.

– From: “The Woman Shall Conquer” by Don Sharkey, Prow Books/Franciscan Marytown Press, Libertyville, IL, 1954

 

 

 

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ST AUGUSTINE OF CANTERBURY, BISHOP AND CONFESSOR

ST AUGUSTINE OF CANTERBURY, BISHOP AND CONFESSOR

ST AUGUSTINE OF CANTERBURY, BISHOP AND CONFESSOR – MEMORIAL: MAY 28

In 597, Pope Gregory the Great sent to England the monk Augustine and a group of forty fellow monks of the Lateran monastery in Rome. King Ethelbert invited them all to Canterbury, the chief city of his kingdom, and Augustine built an oratory nearby. Through his preaching he converted to Christianity many of the islanders and even the king, to the great joy of the king’s Christian wife, Bertha.

THE SEE OF CANTERBURY 

Gregory ordered Augustine consecrated a bishop, founded the See of Canterbury, gave him the use of the pallium and the power to establish a hierarchy in England. Augustine underwent many exhausting labours for Christ.

MANY EXHAUSTING LABOURS FOR CHRIST

He placed Mellitus in charge of the church in London, Justus in charge of the church of Rochester, and Lawrence in charge of his own church. He at last died on the seventh of the Calends of June, and was buried in the monastery of St Peter. After this, the monastery became the burial place of the bishops of Canterbury and a number of kings.

PRAYER:

O God, who graciously enlightened the English peoples with the light of the true faith by the preaching and miracles of blessed Augustine, your Confessor and Bishop, grant, through his intercession, that the hearts of those who have strayed may return to the unity of the true faith and that we may be in harmony with your will. Through our Lord…

– From: An Approved English Translation of the Breviarium Romanum, Burns & Oates, London, 1964

 

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ST PAULINUS OF NOLA, BISHOP AND CONFESSOR

ST PAULINUS OF NOLA, BISHOP AND CONFESSOR

ST PAULINUS OF NOLA, BISHOP AND CONFESSOR – MEMORIAL: JUNE 22

Paulinus was born in the year of salvation 353, of a most illustrious family of Roman citizens at Bordeaux and he later attained senatorial dignity. He was made consul of Nola but, struck by a ray of the divine light, he resigned the consulship and returning to Bordeaux, he was baptised by St Delphinus.

HE DISTRIBUTED HIS MONEY TO THE POOR

Then he sold his abundant property, distributed the money to the poor and retired to Spain, where he was ordained a priest. When he returned to Nola, he built a monastery near the tomb of St Felix and entered upon a most strict monastic life with some companions.

HE BECAME A PRIEST AND FOUNDED A MONASTERY 

As the fame of his sanctity spread, he was elevated to the See of Nola. In the fulfilment of his office, he left wonderful examples of piety, patience, and above all, charity. He wrote many things pertaining to sacred doctrine and was highly praised for his eloquence and poetry. When Campania was laid waste by the Goths, he devoted all his resources to feeding the poor and ransoming captives.

HE SOLD HIMSELF INTO SLAVERY IN PLACE OF SOMEONE ELSE AND WAS TAKEN TO AFRICA

And after that, when the Vandals invaded the same region, since he had nothing more to give, he sold himself into slavery in place of the son of a certain widow, and was taken to Africa. At length, being given his liberty by the help of God, he fell peacefully asleep in the Lord at Nola.

PRAYER:

O God, who promised to those who forsake all things in this world for you a hundred-fold reward in the world to come and life everlasting, mercifully grant that, following closely in the footsteps of the holy Bishop Paulinus, we may look upon earthly things as naught, and long only for those of heaven. Who live…

– From: An Approved English Translation of the Breviarium Romanum, Burns & Oates, London, 1964

 

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ST LOUIS IX, KING AND CONFESSOR

ST LOUIS IX, KING AND CONFESSOR

ST LOUIS IX, KING AND CONFESSOR – MEMORIAL: AUGUST 25

Louis IX, King of France, was reared by his mother Blanche in the high ideals of sanctity. For the sake of recovering Jerusalem, he crossed the sea with a very large army and put the Saracens to flight in his first battle. But, since a great number of his soldiers perished from the plague, he was himself conquered and captured. A treaty was made and he was set at liberty.

HE RANSOMED NUMEROUS CHRISTIAN SLAVES

In the East, he ransomed many Christians who were slaves of the barbarians and also converted many of the infidels to the faith of Christ. After returning to France, he built many monasteries, and hospitals for the poor. He relieved the needy by his beneficence and frequently visited the sick, even waiting on them.

HE WAITED ON THE SICK

He wore plain garb and constantly afflicted his body with a hairshirt and much fasting. When he once more crossed over to wage war against the Saracens and had already pitched his camp in sight of them, he died of pestilence [in 1270] saying this prayer: “I will go into your house, I will worship at your holy temple and I will give glory to your name.

PRAYER:

O God, who transported your blessed Confessor, Louis, from an earthly throne to the glory of the heavenly kingdom, by his merits and intercession we beseech you to make us of the company of the King of kings, Jesus Christ your Son. Who with you…

– From: An Approved English Translation of the Breviarium Romanum, Burns & Oates, 1964

 

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“THE HOLY GHOST I TAKE TO WITNESS…”

“THE HOLY GHOST I TAKE TO WITNESS…”

PRAYERS SAID IN THE 14th/15th CENTURY 

“This creature, of whom is treated before, used, for many years, to begin her prayers in this manner:

First, when she came to church, kneeling before the Sacrament, in the worship of the Blessed Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, one God and Three Persons), of that Glorious Queen of Mercy Our Lady, Saint Mary, and of the twelve Apostles, she said this holy hymn, ‘Veni Creator Spiritus’, with all the verses belonging thereto, that God should illuminate her soul, as He did His Apostles on Pentecost Day, and indue her with the gifts of the Holy Ghost, that she might have grace to understand His will, and perform it in working, and that she might have grace to withstand the temptations of her ghostly enemies, and eschew all manner of sin and wickedness.

THE HOLY GHOST I TAKE TO WITNESS 

When she had said ‘Veni Creator Spiritus’, with the verses, she said on in this manner: ‘The Holy Ghost I take to witness, Our Lady, Saint Mary, the Mother of God, all the Holy Court of Heaven, and all my ghostly fathers here on earth, that, though it were possible that I might have knowledge and understanding of the secrets of God by telling of any devil in hell, I would not.

GOD MAY HELP ME IN ALL MY WORKS, THOUGHTS, SPEECH… 

‘And as surely, as I would not know, hear, see, feel or understand in my soul in this life, more than is the will of God that I should know, so surely God may help me in all my works, in all my thoughts and in all my speech, eating and drinking, sleeping and waking.

‘As surely as it is not my will nor my intent to worship any false devil for my God, nor any false faith, nor to have any false belief, so surely I defy the devil and all his false counsel, and all that I have ever done, said, or thought after the counsel of the devil thinking it had been the counsel of God and the inspiration of the Holy Ghost.

GOD, WHO HATH KNOWLEDGE OF ALL MEN’S HEARTS… 

‘If it hath not been so, God, Who hath insight and knowledge of the secrets of all men’s hearts, have mercy on me therefor, and grant me in this life, a well of tears springing plenteously, with which I may wash away my sins through thy mercy and thy goodness.

‘And, Lord, for thy high mercy, all the tears that may increase my love, and make more my merit in Heaven, and help and profit my fellow Christian souls, alive or dead, visit me with, here on earth.

‘Good Lord, spare no more the eyes in my head than thou didst the blood in thy Body which thou sheddest plenteously for sinful men’s souls, and grant me so much pain and sorrow in this world that I be not delayed from thy bliss, and the beholding of thy glorious Face when I shall pass hence.

… THAT I BE NOT DELAYED FROM THY BLISS… 

‘As for my crying and sobbing, and my weeping, Lord God Almighty, as surely as thou knowest what scorn, what shame, what despite, and what reproof I have had therefor, and, as surely as it is not in my power to weep either aloud or in quiet, for any devotion or for any sweetness, but only by the gift of the Holy Ghost, so surely, Lord, excuse me against all this world to know and trow that it is thy work and thy gift for magnifying thy Name and for increasing other men’s love to thee, Jesus.'”

– The Book of Margery Kempe (modernised text 1936)

 
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Posted by on October 6, 2019 in Words of Wisdom

 

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