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ST CAJETAN, CONFESSOR, “THE HUNTER OF SOULS”

ST CAJETAN, CONFESSOR, “THE HUNTER OF SOULS”

ST CAJETAN, CONFESSOR – MEMORIAL: AUGUST 7

Cajetan was born at Vicenza of the noble house of Tiene and was at once dedicated by his Mother to the Virgin Mother of God. Having obtained degrees in canon and civil laws at Padua, he went to Rome. There he was appointed to a position in the papal trust by Julius II, and then he was ordained a priest.

HE APPLIED HIMSELF CONTINUOUSLY TO THE SALVATION OF HIS NEIGHBOUR 

He founded hospitals with his own money and even served those having infectious diseases with his own hands. He applied himself continuously to the salvation of his neighbour; for this reason he was called the Hunter of Souls.

THE THEATINES 

Earnestly wishing to restore the corrupted discipline of the clergy to the model of the apostolic life, he founded an Order of Clerks Regular [Theatines] who, having laid aside the care of all earthly things, were neither to possess revenue nor to beg for the necessities of life from the faithful, but were to live entirely upon alms given spontaneously.

CAJETAN MADE HIS SOLEMN VOWS

Accordingly, with the approval of Clement VII, at the high altar of the Vatican basilica, together with John Peter Caraffa, Bishop of Chieti, who was afterwards to become Pope Paul IV, and two other men of distinguished piety, Cajetan made his solemn vows. He promoted, in the highest degree, zeal for divine worship, the beauty of the house of God, the observance of the sacred ritual and the more frequent reception of the Holy Eucharist. Full of merits, he passed [in 1547] at Naples, where his body is honoured with great devotion in the church of St Paul.

PRAYER:

O God, who bestowed upon St Cajetan, your Confessor, the grace to follow the apostolic way of life; grant us by his intercession and example ever to trust in you and to long only for the things of heaven. Through our Lord…

– From: An Approved English Translation of the Breviarium Romanum, Burns & Oates, London, 1964

 

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ST BRUNO, CONFESSOR

ST BRUNO, CONFESSOR

ST BRUNO, CONFESSOR – MEMORIAL: OCTOBER 6

Bruno, founder of the Carthusian Order, was born at Cologne [in 1030]. From boyhood, he was distinguished for his gravity of manner and his desire for solitude. He was sent by his parents to Paris, where he made such progress in the studies of philosophy and theology that he earned degrees of master and doctor in both branches. Not long afterwards, on account of his extraordinary virtues, he was appointed a canon at the church at Rheims.

AFTER THE ORDER OF CARTHUSIANS HAD BEEN FOUNDED… 

After the Order of Carthusians had been founded, when he had led the life of a hermit in it for several years, he was summoned to Rome by Blessed Urban II, who had been his disciple. For a number of years, the Pope made use of his advice and learning in the many difficulties of the time, until the man of God, after having declined appointment as Archbishop of Rheims, received permission to depart. He again sought a solitude where, full of virtue and merits, he fell asleep in the Lord [in 1101].

PRAYER:

May we be aided by the intercession of St Bruno, your Confessor, we beseech you, O Lord; that we, who have grievously offended your Majesty by sin, may, by his merits and prayers, obtain forgiveness for our offences. Through our Lord…

– From: An Approved English Translation of the Breviarium Romanum, Burns & Oates, London, 1964

 

 

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ST JEROME, CONFESSOR AND DOCTOR OF THE CHURCH

ST JEROME, CONFESSOR AND DOCTOR OF THE CHURCH

ST JEROME, CONFESSOR AND DOCTOR OF THE CHURCH – MEMORIAL: SEPTEMBER 30

Jerome was born in Strido in Dalmatia. As a youth, he was baptised at Rome and was educated in the liberal arts by Donatus and other very learned men. From a religious motive he travelled through all of Palestine. Then he retired into the vast desert of Syria. There he spent four years reading the divinely inspired books and meditating upon the blessedness of heavenly things.

HE MEDITATED UPON THE BLESSEDNESS OF HEAVENLY THINGS

After being ordained a priest by Paulinus, Bishop of Antioch, he returned to Palestine, to Bethlehem, to be close by the Crib of Christ the Lord. Here he drew up for himself a holy rule and overcame the snares of the devil by pious works and constant reading and writing. From all over the world he was called upon as an inspired authority to settle questions about the interpretation of Sacred Scripture.

AN EXPERT IN THE INTERPRETATION OF SACRED SCRIPTURE 

Pope Damasus and St Augustine consulted him often about very difficult passages of Scripture because of his singular knowledge and understanding not only of the Latin and Greek languages, but also of Hebrew and Chaldaic. He translated the Old Testament from the Hebrew. At the command of Pope Damasus, he made a faithful translation of the New Testament from the Greek and also wrote commentaries on many parts of Scripture. In his extremely old age, he passed [A. D. 420]. He was buried in Bethlehem, and was later transferred to Rome and entombed in the basilica of St Mary Major.

PRAYER:

O God, who graciously gave your Church blessed Jerome, your Confessor and peerless teacher, to explain the Holy Scriptures, grant, we beseech you, that, with the help of his merits and by your assistance, we may be able to put into practice what he has taught us by his life and works. Through our Lord.

– From: An Approved English Translation of the Breviarium Romanum, Burns & Oates, London, 1964 [bold headings added]

 

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THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION

THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION

An awed silence fell over the throng that had gathered in St Peter’s for this history-making ceremony. The tall stately Pope Pius IX had just celebrated Mass at the great main altar. Now he was stepping forward to read his proclamation. Tears of joy glistened in his eyes. In a voice loud and clear but ringing with emotion, he read: “We declare, affirm and define that the doctrine which states that the Blessed Virgin Mary was preserved and exempted from all stain of original sin from the first instant of her conception in view of the merits of Jesus Christ, the Saviour of all mankind, is a doctrine revealed of God and which, for this reason, all Christians are bound to believe firmly and with confidence…”

As he reached the end, his voice broke and tears ran unchecked down his cheeks.

Forty-thousand voices sang the hymn Te Deum Laudamus. The dome of Michelangelo resounded with the triumphant notes. The bells of Rome’s churches rang joyously. That night, Rome was ablaze with light.

This happened on December 8, 1854.

A DOCTRINE REVEALED OF GOD

For centuries, millions of Catholics had believed that the Mother of God had been conceived without the stain of original sin; anything else would have been unthinkable. But the Holy Ghost had reserved the solemn definition for modern times. Our Lady had told Venerable Dominic of Jesus and Mary, a Carmelite who had lived at the time of St Louis Marie de Montfort, that the promulgation was “saved for the latter days of the Church.” This was part of the divine plan, foretold by St Louis Marie, to make our Lady more known, more loved and more honoured in our time than she had ever been before. The Blessed Mother herself had paved the way for the proclamation in 1830 when, to Catherine Laboure, she had called herself “Mary conceived without sin.”

MARY CONCEIVED WITHOUT SIN

The doctrine was an especially appropriate one for the nineteenth century. The great heresy of the day – which has persisted into our own time – was man’s elevating himself to equality with God. The Immaculate Conception reminds us that only Mary, of all human creatures, was conceived without the stain of original sin. All the rest of us came into the world with this mark on our souls. As a result of this sin, we are weak and inclined towards evil. Only God’s help will keep us on the road to salvation. We are absolutely dependent on God.

As the Blessed Virgin was intensifying her campaign, so was the devil. This very city of Rome, which was outdoing itself to honour the great Mother of God, had, just six years before, been the scene of the wildest disorders. They had been directed principally at Pope Pius IX, Christ’s vicar on earth.

WE ARE ABSOLUTELY DEPENDENT ON GOD

In those days the Pope, besides being the head of the Universal Church, was a king. He ruled a country known as the Papal States, and Rome was its capital. In the city there were many “liberals” who opposed the rule of the Pontiff on the pretence that they were in favour of a democracy. Actually, they hated the Church, and they knew no better way of fighting it than by attacking its visible head.

Riot followed riot. The revolutionaries managed to get control of the civic guard, so the Pope was powerless to stop the riots. Events reached a climax in November, 1848. On the 15th, a group of conspirators stabbed to death the Pope’s Prime Minister, Count Pellegrino Rossi. The mob celebrated the murder by carrying the bloody knife triumphantly through the streets. It was even carried to the home of the widow who was alone with her daughter.

Later that night, the mob marched to the Papal Palace. Shots were fired, and some found their mark. Several people were wounded. Monsignor Palace, the Pope’s secretary, was shot dead.

On November 24, 1848, the Pope was forced to flee from Rome. The city was left in the hands of the “liberals,” the men who were “to usher in a new era for mankind, the glorious era of a redemption far different from that announced by Christ.”

ONLY GOD’S HELP WILL KEEP US ON THE ROAD TO SALVATION

It was different all right – horribly different. Under the “Roman Republic,” freedom of the press and freedom of speech were rigidly suppressed. Taxes were increased. All bank deposits, all gold, silver and jewellery were confiscated, as was all the property belonging to the Church. People were thrown into jail without trial. The Minister of Finance requisitioned all hospitals, orphan asylums and other charitable institutions. The inmates were turned into the streets.

In 1830, our Lady had struck in the heart of the enemy territory – Paris. Now, eighteen years later, the devil had struck at the city which was the capital of Christ’s Church – Rome. As things are usually judged in this world, the devil seemed to have the better of it.

MARY HAD APPEARED TO A HUMBLE LITTLE POSTULANT

Mary had appeared in the quiet of the night to a humble little postulant in a convent chapel. So far as anyone could tell at the time, she had had no effect at all on the city or the world. The enemies of religion, on the other hand, were in complete control of Rome. The Holy Eucharist was defiled in public ceremonies. But this control did not last long.

Louis Napoleon, nephew of Napoleon Bonaparte, had become head of the French government. He decided to help Pius IX, who was in exile at Gaeta. A French army marched against Rome, and the “republic” fell on June 30, 1849. The Pope returned to the city on April 12, 1850.

His return did not mean the end of his troubles. He was kept in power only by Louis Napoleon, who was ready to sacrifice him the moment he could gain thereby. Rome was still filled with “liberals” who were ready to repeat their revolution of 1848. King Victor Emmanuel of Piedmont and his crafty premier, Cavour, were campaigning for a united Italy with Rome as its capital. Most people were sure that eventually they would be successful. In addition to the troubles in Rome, there was scarcely a country in the world where the rights of the Church were not being infringed upon. Switzerland, Russia and Prussia were especially violent in their persecutions.

With the Church beset on all sides, there were many who freely predicted that its days were numbered. It was not possible, these people said, for any institution to withstand so many attacks coming from so many quarters at the same time.

THE GATES OF HELL WILL NOT PREVAIL AGAINST CHRIST’S CHURCH 

From a strictly material viewpoint, these people were right. But they forgot Christ’s promise that He would remain with His Church always and that the gates of hell should not prevail against her. They forgot – or did not know – that “Mary must be terrible to the devil and his crew, as an angel ranged in battle, principally in these latter times.

In the midst of all her troubles, the Church had one of her most glorious moments, when Pius IX proclaimed the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception.

Less than four years after the proclamation, Pope Pius IX was to learn with joy that our Lady had appeared at Lourdes and had put what seemed to be the seal of approval on his action by saying, “I am the Immaculate Conception.”

– From: “The Woman Shall Conquer” by Don Sharkey, Prow Books/Franciscan Marytown Press, Libertyville, IL, 1954

 

 
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Posted by on September 29, 2019 in Words of Wisdom

 

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DEDICATION OF THE BASILICAS OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL, APOSTLES: BIBLE READING (ACTS 28:11-16, 30-31)

DEDICATION OF THE BASILICAS OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL, APOSTLES: BIBLE READING (ACTS 28:11-16, 30-31)

DEDICATION OF THE CHURCHES OF STS PETER AND PAUL, APOSTLES – NOVEMBER 18

So we came to Rome.

At the end of three months we set sail in a ship that had wintered in the island; she came from Alexandria and her figurehead was the Twins. We put in at Syracuse and spent three days there; from there we followed the coast up to Rhegium. After one day there a south wind sprang up and on the second day we made Puteoli, where we found some brothers and were much rewarded by staying a week with them. And so we came to Rome.

When the brothers there heard of our arrival they came to meet us, as far as the Forum of Appius and the Three Taverns. When Paul saw them he thanked God and took courage. On our arrival in Rome Paul was allowed to stay in lodgings of his own with the soldier who guarded him.

Paul spent the whole of the two years in his own rented lodging. He welcomed all who came to visit him, proclaiming the kingdom of God and teaching the truth about the Lord Jesus Christ with complete freedom and without hindrance from anyone.

V. The word of the Lord. R. Thanks be to God.

 
 

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SPIRITUAL AND INTELLECTUAL ARTILLERY TO DEFEND THE FAITH

“Five hundred years ago this month, our holy father St Philip Neri was born in the early hours of 22nd July, the feast of St Mary Magdalene. Just hours later the theological virtues of Faith, Hope and Charity were infused into his soul in Baptism. In the wretched heat and humidity that afflict Florence in high summer it was prudent to administer the Sacrament without delay.

The Kingdom of Heaven is like a mustard seed

Our Lord tells us that the Kingdom of Heaven is like a grain of mustard which when it is sown is the tiniest seed in the field, but when grown it becomes a tree in the branches of which the birds of the air come and make their nests. The seed that was planted in St Philip’s heart in the famous Baptistery of St John, and which germinated and took root during his childhood in Florence, would eventually flourish into a mighty tree in Rome. His own room was the nest (he actually called it his ‘nido’) in which the fledgling first Oratory would become the base for an apostolic mission that would earn him the glorious title Apostle of Rome.

The purpose of an Oratory in the plan of salvation

As other Oratories began to be established, it was St Philip’s wish that each house remain autonomous, and this status is preserved to this day in the Church’s law. Nevertheless, every Oratory is to be like a branch that stems from and is animated by that supernatural life that was nurtured in St Philip’s ‘nido’ half a millennium ago. The purpose of an Oratory in the plan of salvation is to give encouragement and direction to anyone who seeks spiritual refreshment in the shade of its bough. An Oratory is supposed to provide a spiritual home, usually in an urban context, in which friendship with Our Saviour is nurtured under the gentle guidance of St Philip and the protection of Our Lady.

…where friendship with Our Saviour is nurtured

Mention of the Counter Reformation conjures up images of the Church rolling out all the engines of war. Established religious orders were to be reformed or suppressed; new congregations would be equipped with spiritual and intellectual artillery to defend the Faith and reclaim territories lost to schism. Jesuits were to be deployed around Europe to engage heretics in public dispute, or despatched to risk life and limb recruiting converts from the heathen New World. In contrast to this, St Philip’s mission within the Church Militant took place entirely on the home front. In the words of Bl. John Henry Newman, ‘He put away from him monastic rule and authoritative speech as David refused the armour of his king… His weapons should be but unaffected humility and unpretending love. All he did was to be done by the light and fervour and convincing eloquence of his personal character and his easy conversation. He came to the Eternal City and he sat himself down there, and his home and his family gradually grew up around him.” In other words, it was through personal contact and friendship that St Philip contributed to the success of the Catholic Reformation.

The Christian/spiritual meaning of friendship

Under the tyranny of sentimentalism that reigns supreme today, there is a danger that friendship can take on a shallow meaning and be understood mainly in terms of feelings and utility. To understand how friendship was so effective in St Philip’s apostolate, it is necessary to appreciate the classical and Christian traditions in which he had been formed by the Dominicans at San Marco, and through his later studies in Rome. In the Aristotelian understanding, friendship is a ‘settled disposition’ – a habit, based on virtue. It involves the recognition of an intrinsic good in the other, and a reciprocated commitment to serve that good and make it flourish. In a truly virtuous friendship, the parties will also work together for the common good. Whereas for Aristotele such friendship is only possible between equals (he said that the one good we must never desire for our friends is that they become gods because if our wish were fulfilled then we should immediately forfeit their friendship), St Thomas Aquinas’s teaching on Sanctifying Grace makes even friendship with God a reality, because God actually shares His Divine Life with us through Baptism.

The infectious spirit of generosity and charity

Saint Philip excelled in making men’s hearts receptive to this vocation to live as friends with God. His joyful influence fostered an ambience in which his spiritual children found pleasure in each other’s company and came to assist each other in living virtuously. A shy cobbler whom St Philip spotted sitting at the back of the Oratory was summoned to the front and hugged like a long-lost child returning to a family that included cardinals and princes. A watch-seller on the verge of bankruptcy found himself suddenly overwhelmed by eager customers at the Oratory, where St Philip’s friends had been primed to come to his assistance. This infectious spirit of generosity and charity was fostered by visits to attend to the poor in the Roman hospitals. Even those who came to the Oratory with unworthy motives were eventually captivated by the ‘Winning Saint’, and some found themselves taking Holy Orders or religious vows as a result.

This school of Christian friendship was the magnificent mustard tree which developed from that seed of the Kingdom planted in St Philip’s heart at his Baptism on 22nd July 1515. By his intercession, and under the protection of the Immaculate Heart of the Blessed Virgin, may it continue to flourish in the Oratory today and in the years to come.”

– From: “The Oratory Parish Magazine – From the Provost”, London Oratory, Vol. 92, No. 1130 (subheadings in bold added afterwards)

 

 

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ABOUT ST JOHN JONES, COURAGEOUS WELSH PRIEST AND MARTYR

12th JULY: ST JOHN JONES, COURAGEOUS WELSH PRIEST AND MARTYR

“St John Jones, also known as John Buckley, John Griffith or Godfrey Maurice – was a Welsh Franciscan priest and martyr.

He was born in Clynnog Fawr in Caernarfonshire (Gwynedd) into a courageous Catholic family who remained faithful to the Church even at the height of the Protestant Reformation.

When John was a boy he entered a strict Observant Franciscan friary at Greenwich. When it was dissolved in 1559 [by the Protestant forces] he moved to Pontoise, where he professed his vows. He later travelled to Rome and stayed at the Aracoeli friary. While in Rome John joined the Roman province of the Reformati, a yet stricter branch of the Friars Minor.

In 1591 he asked to join the English Mission. Despite the evident risk to his life, his superiors agreed and he received a blessing and commendation from Pope Clement VIII.

John arrived in London towards the end of 1592 and laboured in different parts of the country. His brother Franciscans elected him their minister provincial.

In 1596 a spy told the priest-catcher Richard Topcliffe that John had visited two Catholics and celebrated Mass in their home. Although it was later revealed that the two Catholics were in prison at the time the Mass was alleged to have been celebrated, John was arrested, scourged and tortured.

He was then imprisoned for two years.

On July 3 1598, John was tried on the charge of ‘going over the seas in the first year of Her Majesty’s reign [1558] and there being made a priest by the authority from Rome and then returning to England contrary to statute’. He was convicted of high treason and sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered.

His execution was delayed by an hour because his executioner forgot to bring the rope. He used the spare time to preach to the crowd and answer their questions.

He was executed on what is now the Old Kent Road in south-east London. His dismembered body parts were fixed on top of poles on roads leading to Newington and Lambeth.

He was beatified in 1929 by Pope Pius XI and canonised on October 25 1970 by Pope Paul VI.”
– This article was published in “The Catholic Herald” issue July 4 2014. For subscriptions please visit http://www.catholicherald.co.uk (external link).

 

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ST VINCENT FERRER – HE PERSEVERED BY PRAYING THROUGH HIS TEMPTATIONS

5th APRIL: ST VINCENT FERRER

“St Vincent Ferrer was born in January 1350, the fourth child of the nobleman Guillem Ferrer. Legend has it that his father was told in a dream by a Dominican friar that his son would be famous throughout the world and that his mother experienced no pain when she gave birth to him.

From an early age Vincent was renowned for his service to the poor and for his scholastic appetite. At the age of 18 he entered the Order of Preachers, commonly known as the Dominican Order or the Blackfriars. At first he experienced temptations urging him to leave the order. But he prayed through these trials and was ordained in 1379 in Barcelona.

During his three years of training he had studied Sacred Scripture and committed it to memory. He became a Master in Sacred Theology and was later sent to the University of Lleida where he secured a doctorate.

During the Western Schism which split the Church between 1378 and 1418, with Clement VII living in Avignon and Urban VI in Rome, Vincent believed that the election of Urban was invalid and worked hard to persuade Spaniards to follow Clement. Following Clement’s death, Cardinal Pedro de Luna was elected to the Avignon papacy, taking the name of Benedict XIII.

Vincent worked as apostolic penitentiary and Master of the Sacred Palace for Benedict XIII but tried to persuade him to end the schism. Eventually he encouraged King Ferdinand of Castile to withdraw his support from Benedict XIII.

Vincent travelled extensively to England, Scotland, Ireland, Aragon, Castile, France, Switzerland and Italy, preaching the Gospel and converting people. When he preached to St Colette of Corbie and her nuns, she told him that he would die in France.

Vincent was too ill to go back to Spain and died in Vannes, Brittany, at the age of 69. Vincent was canonised by Pope Calixtus III on June 3 1455. He is the patron saint of builders because he is celebrated for ‘building up’ the Church. He is also the patron of orphanages and is still invoked by fishermen during storms.”
– This article was published in “The Catholic Herald” issue March 28 2014. For subscriptions please visit http://www.catholicherald.co.uk (external link).

 

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“WE WANT TO BE CLOSE TO THE SOURCE AND THE TOMB OF ST PETER” – HOLLYWOOD FILM WITH A TRULY CATHOLIC THEME

THE CHARISMA OF THE MAIN CHARACTER

“Obvious, one might say, thinking about the charisma of the character. A charisma, and a history that will soon end up on the big screen. To bring to the cinema, the figure of Jorge Mario Bergoglio will be the 57-year old German producer and director Christian Peschken. That, according to reports from the U.S. Site National Catholic Register, has already been achieved by a group of European investors who have put up a loan of $25 million.

ABOUT THE PRODUCER

Peschken, who was recently converted to Catholicism, was born in Germany but now lives and works in Hollywood. The title of the film would be ready, ‘The friend of the poor: the story of Pope Francis.’ ‘When I saw him looking down from the balcony of the loggia of blessings, I thought: this scene would be the perfect climax for a film. The idea was born at that time and since then I have never stopped working on it.’

‘THE PERFECT CLIMAX FOR A FILM’

The project involves several people. Andrea Tornielli, a Vatican Press and the Vatican Insider, the author of several books including a biography of the pope just published – ‘Francis: The Life, the ideas, the Pope’s words that will change history’ (publisher Piemme) – has given its availability for advice. The German director has also contacted Sergio Rubin, the author of a book-length interview with the then Cardinal Bergoglio, the Spanish director Antonio Cuadri and the Italian Vittorio Storaro as director of photography.

‘A PASTOR FOR SO MANY’

‘Our wish is that we want the film to speak to everyone,’ said Peschken. It will be the story of a man who followed God’s call to become a pastor for so many.’

The plan is to shoot the film in Argentina, but especially Rome. ‘We want to be close to the source, so to speak, and the tomb of Peter. Who knows, maybe we’ll have some extra help from the Holy Spirit…’ Filmimg is expected to begin early [2014]. ‘We hope that the film will receive the blessing of the Pope and it would be great if it reaches the theatres on December 17, the birthday of the pontiff. Given the history and qualities of the main character we are sure that it could be an international success.”
– This article was published in “Don Bosco’s Madonna” issue August 2013. For subscriptions or to support seminarians please visit http://www.donboscosmadonna.org (external link) or http://www.dbmshrine.org (external link).

 

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ST EPIPHANIUS – “BLESSED ARE THE PEACEMAKERS, FOR THEY WILL BE CALLED SONS OF GOD” (Mt 5:9)

“[On the 21st January], one of the saints celebrated by the Church is St Epiphanius. He lived in the 5th century, at a time when the Church in Europe weathered a period of great political turmoil. Rome had to endure invasions, and various conquerors made life very difficult for ordinary people. Bishops, like St Epiphanus, provided some sense of safety and relief to the people.

A POLISHED NEGOTIATOR

In 483 the Church at Pavia, Italy chose St Epiphanius as its Bishop. The people recognised him as a man of integrity who patterned his life on the Gospel. Later biographers described St Epiphanius as living a simple and disciplined Christian life. St Epiphanius worked tirelessly to improve the welfare of his flock and spearheaded the reconstruction of Pavia, which had been levelled by invaders. He negotiated the release of many prisoners that the invaders had captured. He also intervened to modify oppressive laws and taxes. Twice popes sent St Epiphanius to be a peacemaker between groups who had interfered in Church matters. Later, as a polished negotiator, he was often sent on peacekeeping missions.

PEACEKEEPING MISSIONS

Once, St Epiphanius averted a conflict between Emperor Anthemius and another group. His appeal to the Emperor was as follows, ‘Venerable Emperor, the Lord has ordained that the government of so great a state be entrusted to one who, adhering to the dogmas of the Catholic faith, recognises God as the author and lover of charity. And through whom the arms of peace break the fury of war… A victory without bloodshed will add glory to the annals of your reign. Remember also that he who is first to offer peace looks to his own best interest.’ The Emperor relented and war was averted. Around the year 496 St Epiphanius went to Burgundy to obtain the release of prisoners taken by yet another invading army. Peacemaker to the end, St Epiphanius died of fever upon his return to Pavia.

As Jesus said in his sermon on the mount, ‘Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called sons of God’ (Matthew 5:9).”
– From “Spiritual Thought from Fr Chris”

 
 

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