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Tag Archives: St Ignatius of Loyola

ST FRANCIS BORGIA, CONFESSOR

ST FRANCIS BORGIA, CONFESSOR

ST FRANCIS BORGIA, CONFESSOR – MEMORIAL: OCTOBER 10

Francis,the fourth Duke of Gandia, first shone as an example of upright life at the court of the Emperor Charles V. When he escorted the body of the Empress Isabella to Granada for burial, seeing in her countenance, so horribly changed by corruption, the fate of all mortals, he bound himself by a vow to abandon all things and to serve only the King of kings.

HE VOWED TO SERVE ONLY THE KING OF KINGS

Therefore, after the death of his wife, Eleanor of Castile, he entered the Society of Jesus. He was chosen by St Ignatius as Commissary-General for Spain, and a little later, though against his will, he was selected as the third Prepositor General of the whole Society. Pope Pius V appointed him an associate of Cardinal Allessandrino in an embassy to unite Christian princes against the Turks. Francis undertook this arduous journey and, nevertheless, happily completed his life’s course at Rome, as he would have wished, in the year of salvation 1572. He was added to the number of the saints by Clement X.

PRAYER:

O Lord Jesus Christ, model of true humility and its reward, we beseech you, that as you made blessed Francis one of your glorious imitators by his contempt for earthly honours, grant us to follow his example and to share in his glory. Who live…

– From: An Approved English Translation of the Breviarium Romanum, Burns & Oates, London, 1964

 

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PRAYER TO ST IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA

St Ignatius, you who helped evangelise and spread the Great Message, who was able to re-focus your life, in troublesome times for yourself, on the most important being in life; help us to follow in your footsteps, through the long and troubling task, of re-focusing ourselves on the Almighty One, God, our Saviour. Amen.

 
 

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“BLESS THE LORD, O MY SOUL, AND FORGET NOT ALL HIS BENEFITS”

“Just over two weeks ago Pope Francis declared a new Saint for the Church. St Peter Faber was born in 1506 to a peasant family in the village of Villaret, in the Duchy of Savoy. As a boy, St Peter was a shepherd in the high pastures of the French Alps. He had then received little education, but a remarkable memory; he could hear a sermon in the morning and then recount it, almost verbatim, to his friends later on.

In 1525 St Peter went to Paris to pursue some studies. He was admitted to the College Sainte-Barbe, the oldest school in the University of Paris, where he shared lodgings with Francis Xavier. There St Peter’s spiritual views began to develop and he and Francis Xavier received the degree of Master of Arts on the same day in 1530. St Peter also met Ignatius of Loyola at the university and became one of his associates. These three became roommates and together later they formed the Society of Jesus (Jesuits).

St Peter was the first to be ordained a priest and then, after journeying to Spain and France, he travelled to Italy to meet up again. They then travelled to Rome and put themselves at the disposal of Pope Paul III. The Pope sent St Peter to Parma and Piacenza, where he brought about a revival of piety among the people. Recalled to Rome in 1540, St Peter was then sent to Germany to uphold the Catholic position at various meetings with Protestants.

After his experiences at this time he concluded that reform of the Catholic Church was vital, especially for the clergy who often lived lavish lifestyles. As a lone Jesuit, St Peter never felt alone because of his spirituality and connectedness with things of the other world, including angels and saints. His guardian angel became his chief ally.

After travelling to Spain, the Pope again sent him back to Germany where St Peter worked on reforming the Church. He regained the confidence of the clergy and gained many new recruits for the Jesuits. St Peter later continued his work in Belgium, Portugal and Spain. In 1546, at the age of only forty, St Peter had become exhausted by his travels and hard work. Having been called back to Rome, he died of fever on 17 July.

In his diary of his spiritual life, St Peter wrote in a brief entry in 1546 some words from the Psalms: ‘Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits’. These words should apply to all of us.”
– From: “Spiritual Thought from Fr Chris”

 
 

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“DIALOGUE WITH ALL” – CANONISATION OF BL. PETER FABER

“Pope Francis is expected to issue a decree declaring one of his favourite Jesuits, Blessed Peter Faber, a saint, it emerged this week.

The decree is likely to take the form of what the Vatican terms an ‘equivalent canonisation,’ in which the Pope inserts the name of the new saint in the universal calender of saints without verifying a miracle performed through his intercession and without holding a canonisation ceremony.

‘STUDIED AND EVALUATED ON ITS MERITS’

Fr Marc Lindeijer, vice postulator or promoter of Jesuit Causes, said that ‘more or less right after his election’ in March, Pope Francis asked that the process be started for the canonisation of Blessed Faber, who with St Ignatius of Loyola and St Francis Xavier, was a founding member of the Society of Jesus. Under Church law Pope Francis could have signed a decree immediately, Fr Lindeijer said, but instead he asked that the Cause ‘be studied and evaluated on its merits’.

LIKE ST ANGELA OF FOLIGNO AND ST HILDEGARD OF BINGEN

The ‘equivalent canonisation’ – used most recently for St Angela of Foligno and St Hildegard of Bingen – recognise the candidates’ fame for holiness and veneration by Catholic faithful sustained over centuries.

FOUNDED BY A GROUP

Cardinal members of the Congregation for Saints’ Causes are scheduled to meet in December to vote on whether or not to recommend the Pope declares Blessed Peter Faber a saint. Fr Lindeijer said a panel of historians and a group of theologians convoked by the Congregation already voted unanimously in favour of the canonisation, and he said he would be surprised if the cardinals did not follow suit.

For modern Jesuits, he said, the canonisation would be another step forward in recognising that the Society of Jesus was founded by a group of companions and not only by St Ignatius. ‘Many feel there has been too much focus on one man, one founder, as if Ignatius embodied the whole charism’ of the Jesuits, Fr Lindeijer said.

Faber, who was born in 1506 in what is now France, shared lodgings with Ignatius and Francis Xavier at the College of St Barbara at the University of Paris. Faber actually was the first of the Jesuits to be ordained a priest and he celebrated Mass in 1534 at which St Ignatius and the others took their vows of poverty, chastity and obedience.

‘CAPABLE OF GREAT AND STRONG DECISIONS’

Fr Antonio Spadaro, editor of ‘La Civilta Cattolica’, who conducted the interview with Pope Francis published in Jesuit periodicals in September, spoke to Pope Francis about his favourite Jesuits. Asked what he admired about Faber, the Pope said his ‘dialogue with all, even the most remote and even with his opponents; his simple piety, a certain naivete, perhaps, his being available straightaway, his careful interior discernment, the fact that he was a man capable of great and strong decisions.'”
– This article by Cindy Wooden was published in “The Catholic Herald” issue December 6 2013. For subscriptions please visit http://www.catholicherald.co.uk (external link).

 
 

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THE BEGINNINGS OF THE SOCIETY OF JESUS

ST IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA

“Inigo de Recalde de Loyola, youngest of 13 children of Don Beltran Yanez de Loyola and Maria Saenz di Licona y Balda, was born in 1491 in the family castle in the Basque province of Guipozcoa, in northeastern Spain, near the French border.

As befitted a boy from an aristocratic family, he spent time as a page at the court of Ferdinand and Isabella, the rulers of Spain. Here, by his later testimony, he was involved in gambling, wenching, and duelling.

He then entered military service, but fought in only one major battle, the defence of Pamplona against the French in 1521. The professional soldiers knew that their position was indefensible, and proposed to surrender. Inigo (or Ignatius, to give him the Latin form of his name) had visions of military glory, and urged his comrades to fight. He was promptly hit in the leg by a cannon ball, the town surrendered anyway, and the French sent him home on a stretcher.

The leg was badly set, and did not heal properly. It had to be rebroken and reset, and again it healed crookedly and left him with a permanent limp. Meanwhile, he was bedridden for many months and spent the time reading.

He asked for tales of knightly adventure but instead was given a Life of Christ, written by a Carthusian monk. He read it and his life was transformed.

Ignatius made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem to see with his own eyes the scenes of Our Lord’s life and death. He wanted to stay and preach to the Muslims, but the Franciscans stationed there advised him that he needed an education in order to preach effectively.

Back in Spain, he spent ten years (1524-1534) getting an education at Barcelona, Alcala, Salamanca and Paris, beginning by going to elementary school to learn Latin grammar and ending with a Master of Arts degree from the University of Paris. In Salamanca, he often preached to groups of people assembled by chance; but in those days a layman undertaking to preach on his own, without a licence or supervision, was automatically suspected of heresy.

Ignatius was twice imprisoned by the Spanish Inquisition and questioned about his beliefs, an experience that made a deep impression on him. (He was finally acquitted, but forbidden to discuss religious matters for three years.)

In 1534, he and six fellow students formed a group which vowed to travel to Jerusalem and there preach the Gospel to the Muslims. (The most famous of the six is Francis Xavier, who went to India and China as a missionary, and who is commemorated on 3rd December.)

This group later took the name, ‘The Society of Jesus,’ and. Were nicknamed the Jesuits by outsiders, a nickname that stuck.
– This article was published in “The Catholic Universe” issue Sunday 25th August, 2013. For subscriptions please visit http://www.thecatholicuniverse.com (external link).”

 
 

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A VERY SHORT BIOGRAPHY OF ST IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA

ST IGNATIUS OF LOYOLA, PRIEST; MEMORIAL: JULY 31

Born in 1491 at Loyola in the north of Spain, of a courtly family, St Ignatius became a soldier, but during convalescence from a wound he was converted to a deep love of Christ, and a missionary sense. He studied theology in Paris. With companions, he formed the Society of Jesus, to resist the Protestant Reformation, to reform the Church from within, and to educate the young in religion. He died in 1556, at Rome.

PRAYER:

Father,
you gave Saint Ignatius of Loyola to your Church
to bring greater glory to your name.
May we follow his example on earth
and share the crown of life in heaven.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

 

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I LOVE YOU, O MY LORD MOST HIGH (HYMN)

I love you, O my Lord most high,
for first your love has captured me;
I seek no other liberty:
bound by your love, I shall be free.

May memory no thought suggest
but shall to your pure glory tend,
may understanding find no rest,
except in you, its only end.

All mine is yours: say but the word,
say what you will, it shall be done;
I know your love, most gracious Lord,
I know you seek my good alone.

Apart from you, nothing can be,
so grant me this, my only wish,
to love you, Lord, eternally,
you give me all in giving this.
– St Ignatius of Loyola
tr. Edward Caswall

 

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