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PRAYER FOR VOCATIONS

PRAYER FOR VOCATIONS

Lord Jesus Christ, Shepherd of souls, who called the apostles to be fishers of men, raise up new apostles in your holy Church. Teach them that to serve you is to reign: to possess you is to possess all things. Kindle in the young hearts of our sons and daughters the fire of zeal for souls. Make them eager to spread your Kingdom on earth. Grant them the courage to follow you, who are the Way, the Truth and the Life; who live and reign for ever and ever. Amen.

Mary, Queen of the Clergy, pray for us. Help our students who are preparing for the priesthood.

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“MY SON FEELS CALLED TO THE PRIESTHOOD. HE’LL BE SO LONELY…?”

“Parents’ Myth #2

‘He’ll be so lonely.’

This is an easy myth to dispel. Priests are surrounded by people! After all, their job is to bring Jesus to people and people to Jesus.

They are continually working with parish staff, young adults, and a myriad of people who come to them for spiritual advice. Seminaries today are very deliberate in teaching men how to form good, healthy relationships with the people of their parish and the priests of their dioceses. Sure, there can be lonely moments – but the same is true in any vocation, marriage included.

Most priests have healthy friendships with brother priests, lay people, and family that keep them grounded and connected.”

– This item was published in the leaflet “Vocations” by the Archdiocese of Southwark. For further information please visit http://www.southwarkvocations.com (external link)

 
 

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HOW TO BECOME A RELIGIOUS SISTER (CATHOLIC NUN)

“From discovering a community to taking the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience

Religious sisters are called by God to live a special life as brides of Christ in service to the Church. Because becoming a religious sister is a serious commitment, there are several stages in the process:

1. “Come and See”

A time of visiting various religious orders to learn about them, meet the sisters, and explore different charisms. At this time, a woman feels called to religious life, but doesn’t know which order to join.

2. Aspirancy/Pre-Candidacy

When a woman feels called to a particular religious order, she starts the application process. While in application, she is called an ‘aspirant’ because she aspires to join the order.

3. Postulancy/Candidacy

When a woman’s application has been accepted, she joins the day-to-day prayer and work of the order, albeit in an exploratory way. She learns more about the sisters, and begins formation, perhaps taking classes in theology and scripture. This is a time of further discernment. Length can vary depending on the person and the order.

4. Novitiate

At this stage a woman is called a ‘novice’ because she is new to the order. For a period of about two years, the novice lives the life of the order in nearly every way and continues formation. This period is analogous to being engaged; the dating is over and now she is moving toward making vows.

5. Vows

When a woman and the community feel sure about her call, she vows poverty, chastity, and obedience, which together are called the ‘evangelical counsels.’ In most orders (though not all), members profess perpetual vows after a period of three or more years after they first take vows. Note that while the process of formation is similar, each religious community has its own particular nuances. It’s best to ask the vocation director of a particular order about their process.”

– From the leaflet: “Archdiocese of Southwark, Vocations” – web address, further reading: http://www.southwarkvocations.com (external link).

 

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AIMED AT COUNTRIES WITH A CHRISTIAN HERITAGE WHICH CURRENTLY GO THROUGH A CRISIS OF FAITH

“The Archbishop who leads the Pontifical Council for the New Evangelisation hailed a vocations festival in Birmingham last weekend as a ‘beautiful experience’.

‘PUTTING JESUS CHRIST AT THE CENTRE OF OUR DAYS’

Archbishop Rino Fisichella said: ‘Invocation is a very beautiful experience for the New Evangelisation. It is an experience of prayer, it is an experience of friendship, it is an experience which encourages us to put Jesus Christ at the centre of our days. There is a lot of people thinking and searching in the same way so I think this is a moment of grace.’

‘A MOMENT OF GRACE’

The Invocation festival took place last weekend at Oscott seminary and attracted more than 400 people hoping to discern their vocation.

The New Evangelisation is a term introduced by Saint John Paul II. The late pope often used the term in his encyclicals and writings when outlining how the Church should combat the challenges of secular culture.

COMBATTING THE CHALLENGES OF SECULAR CULTURE

Archbishop Fisichella said: ‘New Evangelisation means, essentially, to find a new language method, enthusiasm’. He said it was aimed at countries with a Christian heritage but that had a crisis of faith.”
– This article was published in “The Catholic Herald” issue July 11 2014. For subscriptions please visit http://www.catholicherald.co.uk (external link).

 

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“I FIRST WANTED TO BE A NUN WHEN I WAS SIX YEARS OLD AND GOD’S CALL NEVER LEFT ME”

“A woman who has nurtured a religious vocation since she was a girl of six years old has finally made her monastic profession as a Tyburn Nun.

Sister Marie-Joseph Newsome was clothed in the white robe of the Adorers of the Sacred Heart of Jesus of Montmatre OSB at Tyburn Convent, London.

Her sisters, Sharon and Wendy, travelled from their native Auckland, New Zealand, to attend the ceremony.

Sister Marie-Joseph, 33, entered the Tyburn Nuns in New Zealand in January 2007 when she was 26. Her monastic profession ends a journey which began as a child but is also the start of a new quest for perfection.

‘MONASTIC PROFESSION IS AN IMMOLATION OF OUR WHOLE BEING…’

She said: ‘Monastic profession is an immolation of our whole being which, made with love, is extremely pleasing to God.

‘It becomes for those who remain faithful to it the starting point towards perfection and an unfailing source of spiritual blessings.’

She continued: ‘I first wanted to be a nun when I was six years old and God’s call never left me.

‘At first I thought I was called to be a missionary nun so I remember when I was nine years old starting to practise hard for missionary life by wanting to wash myself with just a bucket of cold water and to sleep on the floor… but God had other plans.’

Sister Marie-Joseph added: ‘Coming to England as part of my formation has helped me grow in my vocation.

‘It is good to be on the spot where our Mother Foundress, Marie Adele Garnier, lived and died and also where the Tyburn martyrs gave up their lives for God.’

‘AN UNFAILING SOURCE OF SPIRITUAL BLESSINGS’

The chief celebrant at the Mass for the monastic profession was Bishop Denis Browne of Hamilton, New Zealand, who travelled more than 12,000 miles just for the occasion.

The profession involved Mother Xavier McMonagle, Mother General of the Tyburn Nuns, expressing the charism of the order, asking, among other questions, if Sr Marie-Joseph was willing to persevere in her vows ‘until death’ and if she would ‘strive constantly for the perfect love of God and of your neighbour’.

To each question Sister Marie-Joseph responded: ‘I am.’

She then lay prostrate before the altar while chantresses sang the litany of the saints. The Mother General read out the formula of profession and placed it on the altar where it was signed by Sister Marie-Joseph.

‘TRUST IN GOD’

The nun then sang out her trust in God before the altar with her arms extended before she was consecrated by Bishop Browne.

The white cowl, crucifix and ring were blessed and Mother McMonagle then dressed Sr Marie-Joseph in her new robe.

The crucifix was presented to her by the bishop and the ring placed on her finger by the Mother General, followed by the kiss of peace before the liturgy of the Eucharist.”
– This article by Simon Caldwell entitled “Sister has come a long way to fulfil dream of being a nun” was published in “The Catholic Universe” issue Friday 27th June, 2014. For subscriptions please visit http://www.thecatholicuniverse.com (external link).

 

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ARE YOU CALLED TO THE BENEDICTINE LIFE?

“Are you called to the Benedictine life of Divine Praise and Eucharistic adoration, for the Church?

Contact the

Tyburn Nuns, Adorers of the Sacred Heart,
Mother M. Xavier,
8 Hyde Park Place,
London W2 2LJ
United Kingdom

Tel. (020) 7723 7262 “

 

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ARE YOU CALLED TO JOIN THE FRANCISCANS?

“THE FRANCISCANS – THE FRIARS MINOR CONVENTUAL

THE GREYFRIARS

Saint Francis is the inspiration for humanity. Through his example and his teachings Saint Francis has become a symbol of peace, of the environment and love of the poor.

This is reflected in the life and work of the modern Friar. Saint Francis inspired St Maximilian Kolbe to the extent of being proclaimed not only a Saint but the ‘Patron of the 20th Century’. We, the friars, are striving to continue the work that he began. The Crusade of Mary Immaculate as his work is known in Great Britain and Ireland.

The Friar Minor Conventual lives in community. Loneliness is the scourge of many in the world today. We each need others to care for, to respond to, to share with, to help, and for them to help us. The Franciscan community strives to provide these needs as best as it can by lives centred on Christ, a life of prayer and service for all.

Missions and parishes form the main aspect of our work in these Islands.

Write for further information to:
The Vocations Director
St Patrick’s Friary,
26 Cornwall Road, Waterloo
London SE1 8TW

(For Ireland)
The Vocations Director
Visitation Friary,
Fairview Strand
Fairview
Dublin 3 “

 
 

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